the facts were these:


tagged:
#omg
#gpoy

kingsleyyy:

i want a bf :/

and by bf i mean Benjamin Franklin as in a 100 dollar bill

Normally we see Latin American actors playing gangsters and drug dealers, yet since you emerged on the big screen, you have been playing characters that are often reserved for white guys. How do you do that?

tagged:
#gpoy
#:(

notafraidofstopping876:

broadwayismagic:

nxt-2-nrml:

How does being a fan of Broadway even work for people who don’t live in New York? like, are you guys ok?

No. No we’re not.

image

Lee Pace SDCC 2014 Portraits

dearninety:

Sailor Petals, 31.8 x 40.9 cm, Acrylic on Canvas

dearninety:

Sailor Petals, 31.8 x 40.9 cm, Acrylic on Canvas


Betty Draper started Mad Men as an almost completely powerless woman, married to a man who slept around on her and trapped in a life she didn’t want, though she would never be able to articulate why. As the series progressed through its first two seasons, creator Matthew Weiner and his writers smartly established that Betty wasn’t just another repressed ’60s housewife like viewers had seen in dozens of other stories of the period. She was that, but she was also a spoiled child who’d never had to grow up and now approached the world as if it owed her everything and more. Betty wasn’t the easiest character to like in those first two seasons, but she was decidedly human and the fact that her husband seemed to want every woman but her made her sympathetic almost by default. In the second season when an unstated deal between Betty and Don—one where he would be around the house more and not cheat on her—began to unravel, the heartache she felt was palpable, and the series expertly portrayed a woman who had gotten everything she ever wanted and had begun to realize that wasn’t the answer after all…(x)

Betty Draper started Mad Men as an almost completely powerless woman, married to a man who slept around on her and trapped in a life she didn’t want, though she would never be able to articulate why. As the series progressed through its first two seasons, creator Matthew Weiner and his writers smartly established that Betty wasn’t just another repressed ’60s housewife like viewers had seen in dozens of other stories of the period. She was that, but she was also a spoiled child who’d never had to grow up and now approached the world as if it owed her everything and more. Betty wasn’t the easiest character to like in those first two seasons, but she was decidedly human and the fact that her husband seemed to want every woman but her made her sympathetic almost by default. In the second season when an unstated deal between Betty and Don—one where he would be around the house more and not cheat on her—began to unravel, the heartache she felt was palpable, and the series expertly portrayed a woman who had gotten everything she ever wanted and had begun to realize that wasn’t the answer after all…(x)

Sutton Foster + Reno Sweeney

— hkthemes